VIRGIN ISLANDS CULTURE ART LESSON PLAN  

Moko Jumbie Doodling

National Standards for the Visual Arts

2b Students evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of

organizational structures and functions.

6a Students compare the materials, technologies, media, and

processes of the visual arts with those of other arts disciplines as

they are used in creation and types of analysis.

1a Students apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient

skill, confidence, and sensitivity that their intentions are carried

out in their artworks.

Objectives:

Students will be able to: 

  • Apply the element of arts component  "line" to a cohesive design.

  • Create original Moko Jumbie Doodling designs with structured patterns.

  • Comprehend the history of the Moko Jumble.

  • Justify final artwork with the four steps of  art criticism.

 

 

Teach

  • Read and discuss the lesson objectives.

  • Outline the history of the Moko Jumble in the US Virgin Islands.

  • Produce  at least twelve doodle patterns.

  • Draw an outline of the Moko Jumbie.

  • Design the Jumbie with all twelve doodle patterns.

 KEHINDE WILEY INSPIRED: THE POWER OF A PORTRAIT  

National Standards for the Visual Arts

2b Students evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of

organizational structures and functions.

6a Students compare the materials, technologies, media, and

processes of the visual arts with those of other arts disciplines as

they are used in creation and types of analysis.

1a Students apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient

skill, confidence, and sensitivity that their intentions are carried

out in their artworks.

The power of a Portrait course builds a substantial vocabulary of techniques and terms, focusing on the Elements and Principles of Art. Through specific assignments, students are exposed to various materials, approaches, and methods. Assignments include two-dimensional and three-dimensional projects covering utilitarian forms, abstraction, realism, nonobjective art, and other art forms. Assignments also include Art criticism and Art History. Students will also be creating projects inspired by the work of Kehinde Wiley, a contemporary African American artist. Wiley explores power, race, and identity issues through the exploration of portraiture. Wiley’s portraits depict everyday people he meets on the streets. They reference pieces created by older European masters, thereby encouraging the viewer to contemplate the role of identity and power in portraiture.
By utilizing Wiley’s approach to art-making as a starting point, students will create two 8ft by 4ft portraits and two frames. Early adolescence is a time that is overwhelmed with change: physical, mental, social, intellectual, and emotional. While this age group can be very egocentric, they are also highly influenced by how the rest of the world perceives them.

Objectives:

  • To expose students to the importance of individuality in themselves and others while connecting with the complexities of portraits in history and society’s perception

  • To recognize and identify the Elements and Principles of Art.

  • To develop skills in using the Elements and Principles of Art 

  • To be able to develop ideas, plan, and produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes.

  • To demonstrate proper care and safe use of tools and materials.

  • To identify and discuss the role of the arts in the work force (careers).

  • To demonstrate the role of technology in art production, careers, and as a resource.

  • To identify major artists and artworks.

  • To use appropriate vocabulary through the making and critiquing of artwork.

  •  To experiment with a variety of materials as a mode of expression.

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